Species Profile: The Common Minke Whale

The Common Minke Whale is the smallest in its suborder and is known for “human watching.”

Common minke whale

The Common Minke Whale is one of two species of minke whales both within the suborder of baleen whales.

This whale is the second smallest in size among the baleen whales. The pygmy right whale is the only one that’s smaller. It has a blackish-gray and sometimes purple color with white underbelly. A white band on each flipper distinguishes the common minke whales from others of its kind.

The common minke whale was initially ignored by commercial whalers during the whaling era because of its

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Species Profile: The Fin Whale

Despite being one of the largest whales alive today, the Fin Whale is also one of the fastest cetaceans in the Earth’s waters.

Fin Whale

Fin Whale In The Kenai Fjords Near Resurrection Bay, Alaska (Photo: Lori Mazzuca/WikiMedia Commons, cc by-s.a. 2.5)

The Fin Whale or finback whale is a baleen whale and the second largest creature on Earth; second only to the Blue Whale.

This remarkable creature is unique in a number of ways. For one thing they produce the lowest frequency vocalization of any whale. They produce sounds as loud as 188 decibels but the frequency is so low that humans can’t hear it.

In addition, though so large, this whale is sleek and built for speed.  American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews

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Surprising Facts About Whale Ancestors

Apparently whale ancestors were nothing like the gentle giants we know today.

Hippos In Water :Whale ancestors

Hippos Are The Closest Living Relatives Of Modern Whales.

It may come as a surprise to know that millions of years back, whales looked next to nothing like what we know them to be today.

For one thing, they were unbelievably much smaller than their modern descendants. In addition, they had very

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Lost At Sea: How Whales Lose Their Way Home

Though it sounds strange, whales often get lost at sea. Here are the reasons why.

How Whales Lose Their Way At Sea

Scientists and researchers have not been able to establish a definite reason as to why a whale could get lost at sea and end up on a beach.

Although, there are several assumptions to possibly explain this strange occurrence. Records however show that the phenomenon has been happening since 300BC. But strangely, researchers are now noticing an increase in mass strandings of these creatures especially in recent years.

Unfortunately, it’s still not completely clear why there’s this sudden increase.

From negative human activities, to natural causes, whale strandings are not pleasant in any way and animal

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Species Profile: The Sei Whale

The Sei Whale is the fourth largest baleen whale and an endangered species.

Sei whale with a calf

Sei Whale Mother With Her Calf (Photo: NOAA)

The Sei Whale is another baleen whale and it’s the fourth largest of them after the Blue Whale, the Fin Whale, and the Humpback Whale.

Although it prefers deeper offshore waters, it’s often sighted in most oceans and adjoining seas.

Typically, its body is colored dark steel gray with irregular light grayish to white markings towards the front of the lower body. The Sei whale’s skin is commonly marked with distinct crater-shaped scars caused by wounds

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Is Underwater Sonar Harmful To Whales Or Not?

The debate about underwater sonar and whales has been on for years now. Here are the facts.

Row of military ships: underwater sonar

The debate about whether underwater sonar is harmful to marine life or not, especially cetaceans, has been raging for long now.

Active sonar (sound navigation and ranging), is the transmission equipment used on ships to assist with navigation. But this becomes a problem for some categories of marine animals for example whales and dolphins. That’s because these creatures use echolocation, or bio-sonar systems, to locate predators and prey.

It appears that active sonar transmitters can confuse these animals and even interferes with some of their basic

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Species Profile: The Gray Whale

The Gray Whale resisted capture so much that whalers named it “Devilfish.”

A Gray Whale

A Gray Whale In Captivity (Photo: Marine Mammal Commission/Wikimedia. Public Domain)

The Gray Whale is a medium-sized baleen whale and the only surviving member of its genus and family. This species is a migratory animal that travels annually between its feeding and breeding grounds.

These whales have a hump and a ridge of sharp bumps running down their backs rather than a dorsal fin. They also prefer to stay close to shore – feeding in shallow waters.

The common name, Gray Whale, comes from the contrasting gray patches and white mottling on its dark colored skin. The white patches are the result of barnacles and lice that have attached themselves to the whales’ skins. In

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Recent Mass Whale Strandings And What We Can Do To Help

Mass Whale strandings are becoming a very frequent and unpleasant occurrence.

A Beached Sperm Whale. They Are Prone To Mass Whale Strandings

A Beached Sperm Whale. This Species Is Prone To Mass Whale Strandings

Whale strandings commonly known as beaching, is an unpleasant phenomenon in which these massive aquatic animals strand themselves on a beach. Beached whales, and dolphins, often die due to collapsing under their own weight, dehydration, or drowning during a high tide.

Several scientific explanations of strandings have been proposed in the past; however none have so far been widely accepted as a reason for this behavior. Actually, scientists have never really understood what drives whole

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Whales Are Returning To South Atlantic Remote Islands

Whales and other wildlife are returning in large numbers to South Georgia and the Sandwich Islands.

60,000 Pairs Of King Penguins: Whales Return to South Georgia and Sandwich Islands

Colony Of About 60,000 Pairs Of King Penguins, Salisbury Plain, South Georgia (Photo: Pismire @ German language Wikipedia, cc by-sa 3.0)

The place that was once credited as one of the greatest whaling stations on Earth is once again making big headlines.

In the South Atlantic, South Georgia and the Sandwich islands may not have any human habitation, but they are now thriving with wildlife, thanks to the penguins, seals and whales making their way back to this once deserted place.

The south of Sandwich Islands and South Georgia is a favorite spot for mammals drawn by the abundant krill and fish in the waters. Wherever you look, you can easily spot a seal, a penguin or a whale – an incredible sight to watch.

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Rescuing A Stranded Whale: 5 Safety Tips To Remember

Here’s what to do if you come across a Stranded Whale.

Sperm Whales Beached near Gibraltar Point in Skegness : Rescuing a stranded whale

Sperm Whales Stranded Near Gibraltar Point In Skegness (Photo: Reuters)

Whales are the largest mammals we have on Earth today. But though their natural habitat is in the water, they frequently beach themselves. Though scientists are still not completely clear on what causes this problem there are many factors that contribute to it.

For example, sea tides vary with time. Hence, a whale can be in a “high” tide only to get stranded when the waters recede. However, most studies indicate that whales swim to the shore themselves when they are sick or dying.

In addition, different species of whales are prone to stranding some more than others. Even very large ones like the sperm whale or even the blue whale are not exempted from this problem. But be that as it may, rescuing a

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