Archives for tag: fin whale


Differences Between Sharks And Whales: Which Is A Mammal Or A Fish?

Drawing a clear line between Sharks And Whales can get confusing. Learn which is a mammal and which is a fish. 

Whale Shark: Sharks and whales

A Whale Shark: Despite being called a Whale Shark and sharing several traits with whales, this creature is a fish not a mammal.

If you are anything like most people, you would have at some point thought sharks and whales, especially the very large species, are similar or even related.

Take the example of the largest sharks and whales, for instance.

The whale shark and the basking shark are filter feeders, so are the grey whales, blue whales, and so on. They are

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Can A Whale Swallow A Human Being? Let’s Consider The Facts

There’s a very popular story about a whale swallowing a person. But based on science, can a whale swallow a human being?

Jonah And The Whale: Can A Whale Swallow A Human Being?

Jonah and the Whale (1621) By Pieter Lastman (Public Domain)

If you’re anything like many ocean goers, you may have wondered what it would feel like for a whale to swallow you. Especially if you’ve ever seen one of these absolutely massive creatures in real life.

You’d probably think being swallowed by a whale would be one of the most horrible things that could ever

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What are the Differences between Whales, Porpoises, and Dolphins?

Whales, Porpoises, and Dolphins are all cetaceans but there are differences between each species.

Narrow-ridged finless porpoise in japan: whales, porpoises, and dolphins

Finless Porpoise, Miyajima Aquarium, Japan. (Photo: ori2uru/Wikimedia Commons, cc 2.0)

Whales, Porpoises, and Dolphins are all members of the cetacean species. They are also referred to as placental marine mammals since they carry their fetus in their uterus during most of the fetal developmental stage. They feed, suckle and give birth to their young ones underwater exclusively.

These aquatic animals are also referred to as “Conscious Breathers” because they can decide when to breathe. This feature differentiates them from sharks. Most sharks need to keep moving around before they can breathe.

But in contrast to sharks, cetaceans can remain motionless in the water when they want to sleep. However, they

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Species Profile: The Common Minke Whale

The Common Minke Whale is the smallest in its suborder and is known for “human watching.”

Common minke whale

The Common Minke Whale is one of two species of minke whales both within the suborder of baleen whales.

This whale is the second smallest in size among the baleen whales. The pygmy right whale is the only one that’s smaller. It has a blackish-gray and sometimes purple color with white underbelly. A white band on each flipper distinguishes the common minke whales from others of its kind.

The common minke whale was initially ignored by commercial whalers during the whaling era because of its

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Species Profile: The Fin Whale

Despite being one of the largest whales alive today, the Fin Whale is also one of the fastest cetaceans in the Earth’s waters.

Fin Whale

Fin Whale In The Kenai Fjords Near Resurrection Bay, Alaska (Photo: Lori Mazzuca/WikiMedia Commons, cc by-s.a. 2.5)

The Fin Whale or finback whale is a baleen whale and the second largest creature on Earth; second only to the Blue Whale.

This remarkable creature is unique in a number of ways. For one thing they produce the lowest frequency vocalization of any whale. They produce sounds as loud as 188 decibels but the frequency is so low that humans can’t hear it.

In addition, though so large, this whale is sleek and built for speed.  American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews

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Species Profile: The Sei Whale

The Sei Whale is the fourth largest baleen whale and an endangered species.

Sei whale with a calf

Sei Whale Mother With Her Calf (Photo: NOAA)

The Sei Whale is another baleen whale and it’s the fourth largest of them after the Blue Whale, the Fin Whale, and the Humpback Whale.

Although it prefers deeper offshore waters, it’s often sighted in most oceans and adjoining seas.

Typically, its body is colored dark steel gray with irregular light grayish to white markings towards the front of the lower body. The Sei whale’s skin is commonly marked with distinct crater-shaped scars caused by wounds

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Is Underwater Sonar Harmful To Whales Or Not?

The debate about underwater sonar and whales has been on for years now. Here are the facts.

Row of military ships: underwater sonar

The debate about whether underwater sonar is harmful to marine life or not, especially cetaceans, has been raging for long now.

Active sonar (sound navigation and ranging), is the transmission equipment used on ships to assist with navigation. But this becomes a problem for some categories of marine animals for example whales and dolphins. That’s because these creatures use echolocation, or bio-sonar systems, to locate predators and prey.

It appears that active sonar transmitters can confuse these animals and even interferes with some of their basic

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Species Profile: The Gray Whale

The Gray Whale resisted capture so much that whalers named it “Devilfish.”

A Gray Whale

A Gray Whale In Captivity (Photo: Marine Mammal Commission/Wikimedia. Public Domain)

The Gray Whale is a medium-sized baleen whale and the only surviving member of its genus and family. This species is a migratory animal that travels annually between its feeding and breeding grounds.

These whales have a hump and a ridge of sharp bumps running down their backs rather than a dorsal fin. They also prefer to stay close to shore – feeding in shallow waters.

The common name, Gray Whale, comes from the contrasting gray patches and white mottling on its dark colored skin. The white patches are the result of barnacles and lice that have attached themselves to the whales’ skins. In

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Whales Are Returning To South Atlantic Remote Islands

Whales and other wildlife are returning in large numbers to South Georgia and the Sandwich Islands.

60,000 Pairs Of King Penguins: Whales Return to South Georgia and Sandwich Islands

Colony Of About 60,000 Pairs Of King Penguins, Salisbury Plain, South Georgia (Photo: Pismire @ German language Wikipedia, cc by-sa 3.0)

The place that was once credited as one of the greatest whaling stations on Earth is once again making big headlines.

In the South Atlantic, South Georgia and the Sandwich islands may not have any human habitation, but they are now thriving with wildlife, thanks to the penguins, seals and whales making their way back to this once deserted place.

The south of Sandwich Islands and South Georgia is a favorite spot for mammals drawn by the abundant krill and fish in the waters. Wherever you look, you can easily spot a seal, a penguin or a whale – an incredible sight to watch.

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